Very Low Frequency (VLF)

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Click the name of a signal to see more detailed information, possible decoding, and additional sound and waterfall samples

Color Legend
Inactive
(No longer in use)
Active
(Currently in active use)
Status
Unknown or Intermittent
Signal Name Description Frequency Mode Modulation Bandwidth Location Sample Audio Waterfall image
Grimeton Radio (SAQ) UNESCO World Heritage transmitter, using an Alexanderson alternator for rf generation 17.2 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz — 40.4 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz CWContinuous Wave Sweden Saq vvv.gif
Jim Creek (NLK) Jim Creek Naval Radio Station is used by the US Navy to transmit commands to distant submarines. 24.8 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz CWContinuous Wave MSKMinimum-Shift Keying (When Shift/Bd = 0.5. It is impossible to get this ratio to be lower than 0.5, hence it is called the 'Minimum' shift.) 300 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz). United States NLK.PNG
Lightning Sferics VLFVery Low Frequency (3-30 kHz) RFRadio Frequency emissions from lightning in the atmosphere that can affect up to HFHigh Frequency (3-30 MHz) frequencies and beyond depending on strength. Has a popping crackle sound with both USBUpper Side Band Modulation (Radio, referring to reception and modulation mode)Universal Serial Bus (Computer, referring to USB Ports and cables) and AMAmplitude Modulation modes of reception. HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz). — 30 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz Worldwide Lightening Sfpherics.png
NML Naval Radio Transmitter Facility (NRTF) transmits encrypted commands to submerged US submarines. 25.2 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz CWContinuous Wave FSKFrequency-Shift Keying 300 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz). United States NML.PNG
NOV TACAMO (take charge and move out) is the back up communications system to the US nuclear submarine fleet in case an attack on land based transmitters disables them. A rotating fleet of Navy E6 jets equipped with 200 KW transmitters and two 2½-mile-long trailing wire antennas (TWA) at 35,000 ft altitude to provide 24/7 coverage. Short pings are transmitted every few seconds. 26.9 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz CWContinuous Wave 26.9 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz Worldwide TACAMO (2).jpg
NPM Naval Radio Transmitting Facility (NRTF) sends encrypted commands to submerged US naval submarines in the Pacific. 21.4 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz CWContinuous Wave FSKFrequency-Shift Keying 300 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz). United States Lualualei HI (2).jpg
NWC Naval Communication Station (NCS) Harold E. Holt. Used jointly by the Australian and United States navies to transmit encrypted orders to submerged submarines in the Pacific. 19.8 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz CWContinuous Wave FSKFrequency-Shift Keying 300 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz). Australia HE Holt Australia (2).jpg
Radioteknicheskaya Systema Dalyoloiy Navigatsii (RSDN-20) Russian Hyperbolic Radio Navigation System. Presumed to be used for Russian submarines and aircraft in the northern hemisphere, possibly worldwide. 11.91 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz — 14.88 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz CWContinuous Wave 20 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz). Russia RSDN20.jpg
SAS/SRC Swedish navy transmitter for submarine communication 40.4 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz MSKMinimum-Shift Keying (When Shift/Bd = 0.5. It is impossible to get this ratio to be lower than 0.5, hence it is called the 'Minimum' shift.) Sweden SAS-SRC mod pattern.gif
SAS2 Swedish navy transmitter for submarine communication 42.5 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz MSKMinimum-Shift Keying (When Shift/Bd = 0.5. It is impossible to get this ratio to be lower than 0.5, hence it is called the 'Minimum' shift.) Sweden SAS2 mod pattern 2.gif
SAS3 Swedish navy transmitter for submarine communication 44.2 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz MSKMinimum-Shift Keying (When Shift/Bd = 0.5. It is impossible to get this ratio to be lower than 0.5, hence it is called the 'Minimum' shift.) Sweden SAS3 mod pattern 2.gif
SHR 38 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz MSKMinimum-Shift Keying (When Shift/Bd = 0.5. It is impossible to get this ratio to be lower than 0.5, hence it is called the 'Minimum' shift.) Sweden Shr mod patterns 1.gif

Pages in category "VLF"

The following 14 pages are in this category, out of 14 total.