SAS/SRC

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SAS/SRC
SAS-SRC mod pattern.gif
Frequencies 40.4 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz40,400 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz).
0.0404 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
40.4 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz
0.0404 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
40.4 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz
0.0404 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
Frequency Range 40.4 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz40,400 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz).
0.0404 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
- 40.4 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz40,400 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz).
0.0404 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
Mode
Modulation MSKMinimum-Shift Keying (When Shift/Bd = 0.5. It is impossible to get this ratio to be lower than 0.5, hence it is called the 'Minimum' shift.)
ACFAutoCorrelation Function
Location Varberg, Sweden
Short Description Swedish navy transmitter for submarine communication
I/Q Raw Recording
Audio Sample

SAS/SRC is the military part of the Varberg site. It shares the antenna with SAQ (Grimeton Radio) https://www.sigidwiki.com/wiki/Grimeton_Radio_(SAQ).

So if SAQ is going to start one of its rare transmissions, SAS/SRC is turned off one or two days before.

Swedish MSKMinimum-Shift Keying (When Shift/Bd = 0.5. It is impossible to get this ratio to be lower than 0.5, hence it is called the 'Minimum' shift.) transmitters can easily be identified in the waterfall diagram by their fishbone-like modulation pattern. This seems to belong to the idle phases while the pattern seem to become more random while transmitting data.