New possible Russian Digimode

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New possible Russian Digimode
Image48754.png
Frequencies 10225kHz10,225,000 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz).
10.225 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
,10240kHz10,240,000 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz).
10.24 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
Frequency Range 10225000 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz).10,225 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz
10.225 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
10240000 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz).10,240 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz
10.24 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
Mode USBUpper Side Band Modulation (Radio, referring to reception and modulation mode)Universal Serial Bus (Computer, referring to USB Ports and cables)
Modulation Unknown (Digital)
Bandwidth 15kHz15,000 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz).
0.015 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
15 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz
0.015 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
15 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz
0.015 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
Location Worldwide
Short Description The signal is believed to be a new russian communication mode/modem. I found this signal with my SdrplayRsp2Pro and a 15m (50ft) longwire antenna with 1:9 Unun. The signal was also heard on the Websdr in the Netherlands so it was not local.
I/Q Raw Recording
Audio Sample
123095684739434.jpg

Far from new. This is a decades old Russian 150Bd/4000Hz 4-tone MFSKMultiple Frequency Shift-Keying signal, 12 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz wide in total (not 15 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz). It can be heard almost daily, most easily on Eastern European receivers in daytime around 4-7 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz, but it's also often heard up to 18-20 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz.