Signal Identification Guide

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This wiki is intended to help identify radio signals through example sounds and waterfall images. Most signals are received and recorded using a software defined radio such as the RTL-SDR, HackRF, BladeRF, Funcube Dongle, USRP or others.

Anyone can edit this wiki, so if you see missing or wrong information please feel free to correct it by clicking the 'edit' button at the stop of the signals page. When doing an edit you will be asked to answer a very simple spam prevention question which will appear at the top of the screen after clicking on Save page.

You can also discuss the signals by using the discussion tab at the top of every page, or just by using the comments box at the bottom of this page.

If you would like to contribute an example signal, please contact me at rtlsdrblog__AT__gmail__DOT__com and send a waterfall image, sound or small IQ sample and any information about the signal that you have. Note that it will probably take me 1 - 3 months to get to your signal. If you want to add a signal yourself please consult the instructions here - Adding An Example Signal. Don't worry too much if you mess up the wiki syntax, i'll eventually patrol all the pages and fix them up if something is wrong.

Software: There is now the Artemis software available which can be used to display the known reference signals in an easy to access offline format.

== Known Reference Signals ==

Known Reference Signals

Title
Frequency range
Location

Mode

Modulation

Sort by order



SMW::offSMW::on
Signal type Description Frequency Mode Modulation Bandwidth Location Sample Audio Waterfall image
"Ghadir" Iranian OTH Radar Iran's OTH Radar, named "Ghadir" is part of Iran's Sepehr Phased Radar System. 28 MHz28,000,000 Hz
28,000 kHz
29.7 MHz29,700,000 Hz
29,700 kHz
USB 60 kHz60,000 Hz
0.06 MHz
Worldwide IranOTH.png
29B6 OTH Radar Sounder This is an Over The Horizon Radar Sounder signal from the 29B6 OTH Radar (Nicknamed "Kontayner"). It is used to check frequencies that are not in use. It commonly overlaps Amateur and broadcast shortwave bands 9.2 MHz9,200,000 Hz
9,200 kHz
19.745 MHz19,745,000 Hz
19,745 kHz
USB 13 kHz13,000 Hz
0.013 MHz
Russia Ss (2014-12-14 at 01.58.43).png
AFSK Paging Link It is easier to transmit the FSK pager signal to the transmitter site as AFSK. It is changed to POCSAG format when re-transmitted. 72 MHz72,000,000 Hz
72,000 kHz
75 MHz75,000,000 Hz
75,000 kHz
NFM AFSK 9 kHz9,000 Hz
0.009 MHz
Worldwide AFSKPaging Waterfallthmb.jpg
ARQ-E(E3) ARQ-E (also known as ARQ-1000 DUPLEX) is a Synchronous Full-Duplex ARQ system with each station using a different frequency. ARQ-E3 is a varient that uses a different alphabet encoding. Mainly used by French Military Forces. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 85 Hz0.085 kHz
8.5e-5 MHz
850 Hz0.85 kHz
8.5e-4 MHz
Worldwide ARQE3192Bd.png
ATSC Broadcast Advanced Television Systems Committee Television. 8VSB Modulation 54 MHz54,000,000 Hz
54,000 kHz
700 MHz700,000,000 Hz
700,000 kHz
None 8VSB 6 MHz6,000,000 Hz
6,000 kHz
North America No Audio File ATSCthmb.jpg
Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS) Short messages sent to and from aircraft 129 MHz129,000,000 Hz
129,000 kHz
137 MHz137,000,000 Hz
137,000 kHz
AM MSK 5 kHz5,000 Hz
0.005 MHz
Worldwide ACARS waterfallthmb.png
Amplitude Modulation (AM) Long range commercial broadcast and international radio. Also used for aviation communications. 153 kHz153,000 Hz
0.153 MHz
137 MHz137,000,000 Hz
137,000 kHz
AM AM 10 kHz10,000 Hz
0.01 MHz
Worldwide AM Waterfall.jpg
Autocab This is an example of the Autocab Media Data Terminals used by cab companies all over the world. 163.375 MHz163,375,000 Hz
163,375 kHz
NFM PSK 12.5 kHz12,500 Hz
0.0125 MHz
UK Autocabthmb.jpg
Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Used by aircraft as an alternative to secondary radar. It broadcasts (i.e. unsolicited, without waiting for interrogation from a radar station) their GPS position (latitude, longitude) and pressure altitude, their callsign, and their track and ground speed, in separate messages carrying 10 bytes of data each. 1,090 MHz1,090,000,000 Hz
1,090,000 kHz
None PPM 50 kHz50,000 Hz
0.05 MHz
Worldwide ADS-BTHMB.jpg
Automatic Identification System (AIS) Used by ships to broadcast position and vessel information. 161.975 MHz161,975,000 Hz
161,975 kHz
162.025 MHz162,025,000 Hz
162,025 kHz
NFM GMSK 25 kHz25,000 Hz
0.025 MHz
Worldwide AIS WaterfallTHMB.jpg
Automatic Link Establishment (2G ALE) Automatic Link Establishment, 2G ALE (Official designation MIL-STD 188-141A) is the current standardized method of establishing connections between radio operators. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB MFSK 2 kHz2,000 Hz
0.002 MHz
Worldwide 2G ALE.jpg
Automatic Link Establishment (3G ALE) 3G ALE is the next generation of ALE (Designated by MIL-188-141B (Appendix C)). 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB PSK 3 kHz3,000 Hz
0.003 MHz
Worldwide 3G ALE.jpg
Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS) Packet system for real time data communications. Used by hams for location reporting, weather stations etc. 144 MHz144,000,000 Hz
144,000 kHz
146 MHz146,000,000 Hz
146,000 kHz
NFM FSK 10 kHz10,000 Hz
0.01 MHz
Worldwide AFSK1200 WaterfallTHMB.jpg
Automatic Picture Transmission (APT) Used to by the NOAA weather satellites and some Russian weather satellites to transmit satellite weather photos. 137 MHz137,000,000 Hz
137,000 kHz
138 MHz138,000,000 Hz
138,000 kHz
NFM AM 34 kHz34,000 Hz
0.034 MHz
Worldwide NOAAAPT Waterfallthmb.png
Binary Interchange of Information and Signaling (BIIS) European Trunked Radio Standard, 1200 bps. Can transmit both voice and data 446 MHz446,000,000 Hz
446,000 kHz
NFM FFSK 2 kHz2,000 Hz
0.002 MHz
Europe BIISthmb.jpg
CHX200 CHX200 (Also known as PRC-921/GY) is a backpack HF ECCOM transceiver, designed and built by Siemens. 1.5 MHz1,500,000 Hz
1,500 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 300 Hz0.3 kHz
3.0e-4 MHz
Worldwide CHX200.jpg
CIS 3x100 VFT Three CIS-14 signals overlayed on top of each other in a 3100Hz VFT bandwidth, operating at 100bd 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 3.1 kHz3,100 Hz
0.0031 MHz
Russia CIS3x100bd.jpg
CIS 3x144 VFT Three 144Bd FSK signals in a 3100Hz VFT bandwidth. Reportedly phased out. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 3.1 kHz3,100 Hz
0.0031 MHz
Russia CIS3x144bdtfc.jpg
CIS 3xBaudot-50 VFT Three 50bd Baudot signals in a 3100Hz VFT bandwidth. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 3.1 kHz3,100 Hz
0.0031 MHz
Russia CIS3xbaudot50bd.jpg
CIS-11 CIS-11 (Also known as TORG-11) is a radio duplex teleprinter system used by Russian meteorological stations 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 650 Hz0.65 kHz
6.5e-4 MHz
Russia CIS-11.jpg
CIS-12 CIS-12 (Also known as MS5, FIRE, AT-3004D, or AT-3104D) is a 12-tone PSK Russian military multi-channel modem. 7.026 MHz7,026,000 Hz
7,026 kHz
14.6 MHz14,600,000 Hz
14,600 kHz
USB PSK 3.1 kHz3,100 Hz
0.0031 MHz
Russia CIS-12TFC.jpg
CIS-1280 CIS-1280 is a OQPSK (Offset Quadrature Phase Shift-Keying) modulation data modem signal 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
13.369 MHz13,369,000 Hz
13,369 kHz
USB PSK 1.28 kHz1,280 Hz
0.00128 MHz
Russia CIS-1280.jpg
CIS-14 Also known as AMOR and AMOR96. Synchronous FSK duplex teleprinter system with ARQ. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 650 Hz0.65 kHz
6.5e-4 MHz
Russia CIS-14TFC.jpg
CIS-16 Also known as CIS 16x75 Bd, CIS-16 is a MPSK-16 data system using Binary PSK. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB PSK 2.7 kHz2,700 Hz
0.0027 MHz
Russia CIS-16Tfcc.jpg
CIS-300 Known as CIS-300 Burst, FSK mode used with 300Bd rate with a starting and ending tone on the upper part of the signal. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 370 Hz0.37 kHz
3.7e-4 MHz
Russia CIS-300.jpg
CIS-3000 CIS-3000 is an 8-PSK Data Modem protocol. It's source is traced to Russia. 3000 is for its 3000bps speed. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB PSK 3.4 kHz3,400 Hz
0.0034 MHz
Russia CIS-3000.jpg
CIS-36-50 Also known as BEE-36 and T-600, CIS-36-50 is an FSK modem used by the Russian navy. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 300 Hz0.3 kHz
3.0e-4 MHz
550 Hz0.55 kHz
5.5e-4 MHz
Russia CIS-36-50.jpg
CIS-40.5 CIS-40.5 (Also known as T-206) is an FSK signal used in Russian Military Communications Equipment. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 600 Hz0.6 kHz
6.0e-4 MHz
Russia CIS-40.5.jpg
CIS-8181 CIS-8181 is an FSK modem used by the Soviet navy. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 600 Hz0.6 kHz
6.0e-4 MHz
Russia CIS-8181.jpg
CLOVER 2000 CLOVER 2000 is an upgrade to CLOVER-II, a digital data protocol. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB PSK 2 kHz2,000 Hz
0.002 MHz
Worldwide CLOVER 2000.jpg
CLOVER-II CLOVER-II is an 8-bit digital data transmission protocol. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB PSK 500 Hz0.5 kHz
5.0e-4 MHz
Worldwide CLOVER.jpg
CODAR Coastal Ocean Dynamics Applications Radar 4.465 MHz4,465,000 Hz
4,465 kHz
13.5 MHz13,500,000 Hz
13,500 kHz
USB 50 kHz50,000 Hz
0.05 MHz
Worldwide CODARthm.jpg
CRY2001 Voice Scrambler CRY2001 is a voice scrambling mode used on Sailor CRY2001 Scramblers. Fisherman often use these modes to communicate with privacy. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
300 MHz300,000,000 Hz
300,000 kHz
USB FSK 3 kHz3,000 Hz
0.003 MHz
Worldwide CRY2001 Full.jpg
California Smart-Meter This is a signal from a Californian Electricity 'Smart Meter'. Each house is now fitted with one of these, and they are strong - typically 50dB above the atmospheric noise level. 902 MHz902,000,000 Hz
902,000 kHz
928 MHz928,000,000 Hz
928,000 kHz
15 kHz15,000 Hz
0.015 MHz
USA Open-Way-Centron Smart-Meter Waterfallthmb.png
Chinese 4+4 Chinese 4+4 is a multi-carrier transmission mode. It consists of 8 carriers. They are 300 Hz apart, execpt the 4th and 5th carriers, which are 450 Hz apart from each other. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB PSK 2.5 kHz2,500 Hz
0.0025 MHz
China CHN 4+4.jpg
Codan Data Modem Codan Data Modulation for Codan Data Modems. Has 3 distinct signals: Data, ALE, and SELCAL. This modulation is used in Codan's 9001, 9002, 3012 and 3212 modems. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB PSK, FSK 400 Hz0.4 kHz
4.0e-4 MHz
2.56 kHz2,560 Hz
0.00256 MHz
Worldwide Codan Modem.jpg
Contestia Contestia is a digital mode derived from Olivia. It aims to deliver a compromise of speed and performance. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB MFSK 150 Hz0.15 kHz
1.5e-4 MHz
2 kHz2,000 Hz
0.002 MHz
Worldwide Contestiathmb.png
Coquelet MFSK system, similar to Piccolo. Uses ITA-2 charset. It's two main modes are Coquelet-8 and Coquelet-13. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB MFSK 300 Hz0.3 kHz
3.0e-4 MHz
500 Hz0.5 kHz
5.0e-4 MHz
Europe Coq 8 intro.png
D-STAR Digital voice protocol used by ham radio. Is sometimes routed over the internet for international communications. 145.67 MHz145,670,000 Hz
145,670 kHz
NFM 6.25 kHz6,250 Hz
0.00625 MHz
Worldwide DStar Waterfallthmb.jpg
DCF77 DCF77 is a German longwave time signal radio station based at 77.5 kHz. DCF uses an AM modulated carrier and phase modulation sidebands to transmit it's time signal. 77.5 kHz77,500 Hz
0.0775 MHz
USB AM, PSK 1.3 kHz1,300 Hz
0.0013 MHz
Germany DCF77.jpg
Deltafix Deltafix is a DGPS system that is used to provide precision positioning used in the survey and oceanographic industry. 1.7 MHz1,700,000 Hz
1,700 kHz
3.4 MHz3,400,000 Hz
3,400 kHz
USB FSK 250 Hz0.25 kHz
2.5e-4 MHz
Worldwide Deltafix.jpg
Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) A type of digital broadcast radio signal, containing multiple digital radio stations in the signal. 174.928 MHz174,928,000 Hz
174,928 kHz
1,490.625 MHz1,490,625,000 Hz
1,490,625 kHz
COFDM 1.537 MHz1,537,000 Hz
1,537 kHz
Worldwide No Audio File DABthmb.jpg
Digital Audio Broadcasting + (DAB+) A type of digital broadcast radio signal, containing multiple digital radio stations in the signal. Here transmitted on channel 7D. 174 MHz174,000,000 Hz
174,000 kHz
1,492 MHz1,492,000,000 Hz
1,492,000 kHz
COFDM 1.5 MHz1,500,000 Hz
1,500 kHz
Worldwide No Audio File DAB.jpg
Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM) A form of international digital shortwave radio. A digital alternative to AM shortwave radio. 1 MHz1,000,000 Hz
1,000 kHz
22 MHz22,000,000 Hz
22,000 kHz
QAM, PSK, OFDM 4.5 kHz4,500 Hz
0.0045 MHz
20 kHz20,000 Hz
0.02 MHz
Worldwide DRM Waterfallthmb.png
Digital SSTV Digital Slow Scan Television (SSTV). Used by hams to send images. Uses DRM to send images. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
300 MHz300,000,000 Hz
300,000 kHz
USB QAM, PSK, OFDM 2.2 kHz2,200 Hz
0.0022 MHz
Worldwide Digital sstvimg.jpg
Digital Video Broadcasting — Terrestrial (DVB-T) A DVB-T signal, received on a HackRF. 474 MHz474,000,000 Hz
474,000 kHz
786 MHz786,000,000 Hz
786,000 kHz
PSK, QAM, OFDM 5 MHz5,000,000 Hz
5,000 kHz
8 MHz8,000,000 Hz
8,000 kHz
Worldwide except NA No Audio File DVB-T.PNG
Distress Radiobeacon (Analog) Distress Beacons emit a siren signal when activated, used for Search and Rescue teams to find the vessel or ship in distress. 121.5 MHz121,500,000 Hz
121,500 kHz
243 MHz243,000,000 Hz
243,000 kHz
USB FMCW 3 kHz3,000 Hz
0.003 MHz
Worldwide SOS.jpg
Distributed Power Unit (DPU) Distributed power refers to the placing of an extra locomotive at an intermediate point in the middle section of a train. This locomotive unit is remotely controlled from the lead locomotive, and greatly increases both the pulling and stopping power of longer trains. 457.925 MHz457,925,000 Hz
457,925 kHz
NFM 0 Hz0 kHz
0 MHz
Seattle Distributed Power Unit (DPU)thmb.png
DominoEX DominoEX is an IFK (Incremental Frequency Keying) mode that aims to resolve issues that plague MFSK modes. Used to send text over RF. 300 kHz300,000 Hz
0.3 MHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB IFK 173 Hz0.173 kHz
1.73e-4 MHz
524 Hz0.524 kHz
5.24e-4 MHz
Worldwide DominoEx11.jpg
Driftnet Buoy Radio Beacon Driftnet Radio Buoys are extensively used by fishing boats operating in open seas and oceans for collecting long fishing lines or fishing nets, with the assistance of a radio direction finder 1.6 MHz1,600,000 Hz
1,600 kHz
28 MHz28,000,000 Hz
28,000 kHz
USB CW 1 Hz1.0e-3 kHz
1.0e-6 MHz
Worldwide DriftnetBuoyDrift.jpg
EDACS Radio trunking control channel. 160 MHz160,000,000 Hz
160,000 kHz
941 MHz941,000,000 Hz
941,000 kHz
NFM GFSK 12.5 kHz12,500 Hz
0.0125 MHz
25 kHz25,000 Hz
0.025 MHz
Worldwide EDACS96 Waterfallthmb.png
End of Train (EOT) Transmits train telemetry such as brake status and accidental seperation information to the head locomotive. 457.938 MHz457,937,500 Hz
457,937.5 kHz
NFM Worldwide EOT Waterfallthmb.png
European Radio Message System (ERMES) European Radio Message System (ERMES) is a European common standard for paging developed by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ESTI) 169.413 MHz169,412,500 Hz
169,412.5 kHz
169.833 MHz169,832,500 Hz
169,832.5 kHz
NFM PAM 25 kHz25,000 Hz
0.025 MHz
Europe ERMES.jpg
FLEX FLEX is an FSK digital pager protocol developed by Motorola. 169 MHz169,000,000 Hz
169,000 kHz
929 MHz929,000,000 Hz
929,000 kHz
NFM FFSK 5 kHz5,000 Hz
0.005 MHz
Worldwide FLEX.jpg
FSK441 FSK441 is a high speed meteor scatter communication mode. FSK441 uses a baud rate of 441 Bd. 144 MHz144,000,000 Hz
144,000 kHz
444 MHz444,000,000 Hz
444,000 kHz
USB FSK 1.75 kHz1,750 Hz
0.00175 MHz
Worldwide FSK441.jpg
FUNcube-1 Telemetry The Funcube-1 is a Cubesat amateur radio satellite. 145.935 MHz145,935,000 Hz
145,935 kHz
PSK 2 kHz2,000 Hz
0.002 MHz
Worldwide Funcube1 Waterfallthmb.jpg
G-TOR Golay-Teleprinting Over Radio (G-TOR) is an FSK proprietary standard developed by Kantronics Inc. and is used by radio amateurs, military (Irish Air Corps/Navy, Mexican army) and governmental agencies (ICRC). 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 350 Hz0.35 kHz
3.5e-4 MHz
Worldwide G-TOR100.jpg
GMDSS Digital Selective Calling Global Maritime Distress and Safety System's digital selective calling system is a maritime communication protocol intended to initiate ship-to-ship, ship-to-shore and shore-to-ship radiotelephone and MF/HF radiotelex calls. 2.188 MHz2,187,500 Hz
2,187.5 kHz
16.805 MHz16,804,500 Hz
16,804.5 kHz
USB FSK 350 Hz0.35 kHz
3.5e-4 MHz
Worldwide DSC GMDSS.jpg
GSM Downlink (Non-Hopping) GSM Cell Phone Downlink (Non Hopping Signal). Audio sample used NFM mode. 450 MHz450,000,000 Hz
450,000 kHz
1,800 MHz1,800,000,000 Hz
1,800,000 kHz
GMSK 200 kHz200,000 Hz
0.2 MHz
Worldwide GSMthmb.jpg
GSM Hopping GSM hopping cell phone signal. 450 MHz450,000,000 Hz
450,000 kHz
1,800 MHz1,800,000,000 Hz
1,800,000 kHz
None 200 kHz200,000 Hz
0.2 MHz
Worldwide GSMHopping Waterfall.jpg
GSM Uplink Initial GSM connection sent from a cell phone. 450 MHz450,000,000 Hz
450,000 kHz
1,800 MHz1,800,000,000 Hz
1,800,000 kHz
None 200 kHz200,000 Hz
0.2 MHz
Worldwide GSMUplink Waterfall.png
Globe Wireless HF Network Globe Wireless' Maritime Digital Radio was a system of 24 stations around the globe offering data services to large cargo vessels. Since 2014, GW has discontinued their HF network. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB PSK, FSK, OFDM 400 Hz0.4 kHz
4.0e-4 MHz
2 kHz2,000 Hz
0.002 MHz
Worldwide GW.jpg
HC-ARQ Haegelin Crypto ARQ (HC-ARQ) is an FSK synchronous simplex ARQ system (no longer) used by the UN and International Rescue Committee. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 300 Hz0.3 kHz
3.0e-4 MHz
Worldwide HC-ARQ.jpg
Hagelin Crypto HC-265 Voice Scrambler HC-265 is a Voice Scrambling mode developed by Hagelin Crypto for their HC-265 CRYPTOCOM secure voice unit. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 2.25 kHz2,250 Hz
0.00225 MHz
3 kHz3,000 Hz
0.003 MHz
Worldwide HC 265.jpg
Hellschreiber Hellschreiber (Also known as Feld Hell or just Hell) is a teleprinter system developed in the late 1920's by Rudolf Hell, a German inventor. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB OOK, FSK, MSK 350 Hz0.35 kHz
3.5e-4 MHz
800 Hz0.8 kHz
8.0e-4 MHz
Worldwide Feld Hellthmb.jpg
High Frequency Data Link (HFDL) Also known as HF-ACARS, HFDL is an ACARS data link that aircraft use to communicate short messages over long distances using HF signals. 2.9 MHz2,900,000 Hz
2,900 kHz
22 MHz22,000,000 Hz
22,000 kHz
USB PSK 2.4 kHz2,400 Hz
0.0024 MHz
Worldwide HFDL Waterfall.png
Hyperfix Hyperfix was a radio-navigation system developed by Racal. Was used by vessels and ships. Rapidly being phased out in favor of Differential GPS. 1.6 MHz1,600,000 Hz
1,600 kHz
3.4 MHz3,400,000 Hz
3,400 kHz
USB 250 Hz0.25 kHz
2.5e-4 MHz
Worldwide Hyperfix.jpg
ILS Marker Beacon Used by aircraft for Instrument Landing Systems, transmitted by an upward-facing directive antenna at known distances along the approach path. 75 MHz75,000,000 Hz
75,000 kHz
AM 3 kHz3,000 Hz
0.003 MHz
Worldwide 800px-LOM Waterfallthmb.png
ISCAT Ionospheric Scattering (ISCAT) mode used for weak signal long distance radio contact by meteor and Ionosphere scattering. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB MFSK 904 Hz0.904 kHz
9.04e-4 MHz
1.809 kHz1,809 Hz
0.00181 MHz
Worldwide ISCAT-A Sim.jpg
ISM Band Power Meter A wireless electricity power monitor. 433 MHz433,000,000 Hz
433,000 kHz
AM 20 kHz20,000 Hz
0.02 MHz
Worldwide ISMBandPowerMeter Waterfallthmb.jpg
ISM Band Weather sensor Data returned from a consumer weather sensor using the AlectoV1 protocol. 433 MHz433,000,000 Hz
433,000 kHz
AM 4.4 kHz4,400 Hz
0.0044 MHz
Worldwide Alecto wxthmb.png
Integrated Digital Enhanced Network (IDEN) A technology developed by Motorola. It is a type of trunked radio with cellular phone benefits. 854 MHz854,000,000 Hz
854,000 kHz
855 MHz855,000,000 Hz
855,000 kHz
NFM QAM, TDMA 18.5 kHz18,500 Hz
0.0185 MHz
Worldwide IDEN.jpg
Ionosonde An Ionosonde is a radar that examines the Ionosphere by sweeping the HF band and receiving the echos 1 MHz1,000,000 Hz
1,000 kHz
40 MHz40,000,000 Hz
40,000 kHz
USB FMCW 1 Hz1.0e-3 kHz
1.0e-6 MHz
Worldwide Ionosondethumb.jpg
JT65a Amateur radio digital mode designed for HF use in limited power / high noise conditions. 10.137 MHz10,137,000 Hz
10,137 kHz
50.29 MHz50,290,000 Hz
50,290 kHz
USB MFSK 355 Hz0.355 kHz
3.55e-4 MHz
Worldwide JT65athmb.jpg
JT6M JT6M is part of the WSJT suite of digital weak signal software applications developed by Joe Taylor, K1JT 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB MFSK 1 kHz1,000 Hz
1.0e-3 MHz
Worldwide JT6M sim.jpg
JT9 JT9 is a very narrow 9-FSK mode for making contact (QSO's) under extreme weak-signal conditions. 30 kHz30,000 Hz
0.03 MHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB MFSK 20 Hz0.02 kHz
2.0e-5 MHz
Worldwide JT9.png
JTMS WSJT mode for meteor scatter. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB MSK 1.7 kHz1,700 Hz
0.0017 MHz
Worldwide JTMS sim.jpg
Japan Military 8-Channel 2-FSK Data signal thought to originate from Japanese Military/Navy 12.385 MHz12,384,500 Hz
12,384.5 kHz
16.554 MHz16,553,500 Hz
16,553.5 kHz
USB FSK 2.4 kHz2,400 Hz
0.0024 MHz
Japan JP MIL 8Freq.jpg
Japanese Slot Machine (XSL) Known as the Japanese Slot Machine. Thought to be data originating from the Japanese Navy. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
9 MHz9,000,000 Hz
9,000 kHz
USB PSK 2 kHz2,000 Hz
0.002 MHz
Japan Japslotmach.jpg
LORAN-C LORAN-C (short for LOng RAnge Navigation) is a hyperbolic radio navigation system. 100 kHz100,000 Hz
0.1 MHz
USB 20 kHz20,000 Hz
0.02 MHz
Worldwide LORAN-C.png
LTE Network Long Term Evolution Network. Also known as 4G LTE Data. Data service for wireless consumer devices. 700 MHz700,000,000 Hz
700,000 kHz
2,200 MHz2,200,000,000 Hz
2,200,000 kHz
OFDM, PSK, QAM 10 MHz10,000,000 Hz
10,000 kHz
Worldwide LTE Thumb.jpg
Link 11 Link 11 (Also known as STANAG 5511, TADIL-A, and MIL-STD-6011) is a Tactical Data Link standard (formerly known as Tactical Digital Information Link (TADIL) used by NATO and the US Military for Maritime Tactical Data Exchange. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB PSK 2.5 kHz2,500 Hz
0.0025 MHz
6 kHz6,000 Hz
0.006 MHz
Europe/US TDLthmb.png
LoJack LoJack is a vehicle tracking system that allows vehicles to be tracked by police, with the aim of recovering them in case of theft via a small radio transceiver clandestinely installed in a vehicle. 173.075 MHz173,075,000 Hz
173,075 kHz
NFM FSK 10 kHz10,000 Hz
0.01 MHz
USA Lojack.jpg
Logic Trunked Radio Control Control channel for a logic trunked radio system. 148 MHz148,000,000 Hz
148,000 kHz
170 MHz170,000,000 Hz
170,000 kHz
NFM 12 kHz12,000 Hz
0.012 MHz
Worldwide LogicTrunkedRadio Waterfallthmb.jpg
MOBITEX Mobitex is an OSI based open standard, national public access wireless packet-switched data network. 400 MHz400,000,000 Hz
400,000 kHz
900 MHz900,000,000 Hz
900,000 kHz
NFM GMSK, FFSK 12.5 kHz12,500 Hz
0.0125 MHz
Worldwide Mobitex.jpg
MPT1327 Radio trunking control channel. 420 MHz420,000,000 Hz
420,000 kHz
NFM FFSK 10 kHz10,000 Hz
0.01 MHz
Worldwide MPT1327 Waterfallthmb.png
MSM-1250 Modem MSM-1250 (Medium Speed Modem) is a 10 FSK-2 OFDM digital data protocol used by the stand-alone modem "SkyFax", used to transmit and receive faxes on HF. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 2.4 kHz2,400 Hz
0.0024 MHz
2.5 kHz2,500 Hz
0.0025 MHz
Worldwide MSM-1250.jpg
MT63 MT63 is a Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexed (OFDM) digital data mode aimed for use in high noise environments. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB OFDM, FSK 72 Hz0.072 kHz
7.2e-5 MHz
188 Hz0.188 kHz
1.88e-4 MHz
Worldwide MT63 1000 L thmb.png
Morse Code (CW) CW Morse Code is the simplest form of transmission found virtually all over the RF bands for a variety of uses. The most common use of this is for Call-sign Beacons by both Amateur and Military operators. 1 MHz1,000,000 Hz
1,000 kHz
930 MHz930,000,000 Hz
930,000 kHz
USB CW 1 Hz1.0e-3 kHz
1.0e-6 MHz
Worldwide CW morse code.jpg
MotoTRBO Motorola digital voice protocol. 860 MHz860,000,000 Hz
860,000 kHz
NFM FSK 10 kHz10,000 Hz
0.01 MHz
Worldwide DMRMOTOTRBO Waterfall.png
Motorola Type II Radio trunking control channel. 800 MHz800,000,000 Hz
800,000 kHz
960 MHz960,000,000 Hz
960,000 kHz
NFM 8 kHz8,000 Hz
0.008 MHz
Worldwide Moto.jpg
Multi Frequency Shift Keying (MFSK) MFSK is a family of multi-frequency shift keying digital transmission modes. MFSK-8 and MFSK-16 are two well-known amateur radio modes. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB MFSK 154 Hz0.154 kHz
1.54e-4 MHz
630 Hz0.63 kHz
6.3e-4 MHz
Worldwide MFSK 8 thmb.jpg
NFM Voice Used in analog walkie-talkies and communication systems. 27 MHz27,000,000 Hz
27,000 kHz
864 MHz864,000,000 Hz
864,000 kHz
NFM FM 5 kHz5,000 Hz
0.005 MHz
30 kHz30,000 Hz
0.03 MHz
Worldwide NFMvoice.jpg
Nexedge NXDN Trunking Radio trunking control channel. 171.3 MHz171,300,000 Hz
171,300 kHz
NFM C4FM 8 kHz8,000 Hz
0.008 MHz
Worldwide NXDNTrunking Waterfall.png
Nissan Car Key Wireless entry rolling code car key. 315 MHz315,000,000 Hz
315,000 kHz
433 MHz433,000,000 Hz
433,000 kHz
AM 40 kHz40,000 Hz
0.04 MHz
Worldwide NissanCarFob Waterfallthmb.png
Non-Directional Beacon A Non-Directional Beacon (NDB) is a ground-based, low frequency radio transmitter used as an instrument approach for airports and offshore platforms. 190 kHz190,000 Hz
0.19 MHz
1.8 MHz1,800,000 Hz
1,800 kHz
USB CW 1 Hz1.0e-3 kHz
1.0e-6 MHz
Worldwide NDB.jpg
Olivia OLIVIA MFSK is a digital teletype mode designed to work effectively in low SNR settings 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB MFSK 125 Hz0.125 kHz
1.25e-4 MHz
2 kHz2,000 Hz
0.002 MHz
Worldwide Olivia.jpg
Orbcomm Orbcomm satellites are used for monitoring and sending short text messages. 137 MHz137,000,000 Hz
137,000 kHz
150 MHz150,000,000 Hz
150,000 kHz
NFM PSK 15 kHz15,000 Hz
0.015 MHz
Worldwide Orbcomm.jpg
Over the Horizon Radar (OTH) Used by militaries for very long range radar systems. 6 MHz6,000,000 Hz
6,000 kHz
18 MHz18,000,000 Hz
18,000 kHz
USB 20 kHz20,000 Hz
0.02 MHz
Worldwide OTH2.png
PACKET 300 The packet radio protocol is a derivative of the AX.25 and HDLC computer network protocols. Packet radio is a synchronous system in which data is transmitted in ASCII character packets. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 500 Hz0.5 kHz
5.0e-4 MHz
Worldwide PACKET300.jpg
PACTOR I PACTOR-I is a digital data protocol combining elements of PACKET and AMTOR ARQ. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 300 Hz0.3 kHz
3.0e-4 MHz
Worldwide PACTOR Addimg.jpg
PACTOR II PACTOR II is an advancement of PACTOR I. It is up to 8 times faster than PACTOR I. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB PSK 450 Hz0.45 kHz
4.5e-4 MHz
Worldwide PACTOR IIstd.jpg
PACTOR III PACTOR III introduces 6 speed levels that provide higher throughput and improved robustness compared to PACTOR I and II. PACTOR III is on average 3.5 times faster than PACTOR II. With optimal conditions, PACTOR III becomes over 5 times faster. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB PSK 400 Hz0.4 kHz
4.0e-4 MHz
2.4 kHz2,400 Hz
0.0024 MHz
Worldwide PACTORIIIthumb.jpg
PACTOR IV PACTOR IV is the newest iteration of the PACTOR series, advancing from PACTOR I-III. It is 1.5x-3x faster than PACTOR III, and has 10 speed levels. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB PSK, QAM 300 Hz0.3 kHz
3.0e-4 MHz
2.4 kHz2,400 Hz
0.0024 MHz
Worldwide PACTOR IV.jpg
PAL TV Analogue TV Signal. Now phased out in most of the world. 60 MHz60,000,000 Hz
60,000 kHz
QAM 6 MHz6,000,000 Hz
6,000 kHz
8 MHz8,000,000 Hz
8,000 kHz
Worldwide 800px-PALTV Waterfallthmb.jpg
PLUTO II Radar Audio sample recorded in RAW mode. The signal is periodic. It can broadcast for several minutes, before going silent, and reappearing at another frequency. It has been seen in short bursts. 24.055 MHz24,055,000 Hz
24,055 kHz
26.37 MHz26,370,000 Hz
26,370 kHz
USB 20 kHz20,000 Hz
0.02 MHz
Norway PLUTOthmb.png
POCSAG Pager digital signal. 33 MHz33,000,000 Hz
33,000 kHz
932 MHz932,000,000 Hz
932,000 kHz
NFM FFSK 9 kHz9,000 Hz
0.009 MHz
Worldwide POCSAG Waterfallthmb.png
Phase Shift Keying (PSK) A digital teletype mode based on Phase-Shift Keying (PSK) modulation. The most popular amateur radio PSK mode is PSK 31. 1.838 MHz1,838,000 Hz
1,838 kHz
909 MHz909,000,000 Hz
909,000 kHz
USB PSK 10 Hz0.01 kHz
1.0e-5 MHz
1 kHz1,000 Hz
1.0e-3 MHz
Worldwide BPSKthumb.png
Piccolo Piccolo is a MFSK system developed by the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) to communicate with foreign embassies and UK military stations around the world. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB MFSK 180 Hz0.18 kHz
1.8e-4 MHz
300 Hz0.3 kHz
3.0e-4 MHz
UK/Worldwide Piccolo12.jpg
Police Idling Walkie Talkie Radio Signal I found out what Unknown 453 was, the one that I posted a few weeks ago, it is a police idling signal, apparently the police signal belongs to the remote SDR I was listening to, but I got my own SDR now. So yeah, it is an idling signal for a police walkie-talkie 453.6 MHz453,600,000 Hz
453,600 kHz
NFM 0 Hz0 kHz
0 MHz
Unknown Police idlingthmb.jpg
Portable Traffic Lights Signals sent from portable traffic lights that are often used at roadworks. 154.463 MHz154,463,000 Hz
154,463 kHz
NFM 0 Hz0 kHz
0 MHz
Worldwide PortTrafLight Waterfall.png
Project 25 (P25) Project 25 (P25 or APCO-25) is a trunked radio standard developed by The Association of Public Safety Communications Officials International (APCO-25) for use with public safety organizations around the world. 500 MHz500,000,000 Hz
500,000 kHz
860 MHz860,000,000 Hz
860,000 kHz
NFM PSK, C4FM 12.5 kHz12,500 Hz
0.0125 MHz
Worldwide P25.jpg
Pulse Coded Modulated (PCM) RC Toy Signal used for remote control (RC) Toys. 27.145 MHz27,145,000 Hz
27,145 kHz
49 MHz49,000,000 Hz
49,000 kHz
PCM 0 Hz0 kHz
0 MHz
Worldwide PCMRCToy Waterfallwaterfall.png
RBU RBU is a time code radio station located in Moscow. It transmits a continuous 10 kW time code on 66.66 kHz. 66.66 kHz66,660 Hz
0.0667 MHz
USB OOK, PSK 650 Hz0.65 kHz
6.5e-4 MHz
Russia RBU.jpg
RDFT (Redundant Digital File Transfer) RDFT is an amateur radio digital mode used to transmit files. 9.24 MHz9,240,000 Hz
9,240 kHz
AM 1.8 kHz1,800 Hz
0.0018 MHz
Worldwide HM01 Waterfall2thmb.jpg
ROS ROS is an amateur radio digital mode teletype designed for high noise conditions. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB MFSK, CDMA 2 kHz2,000 Hz
0.002 MHz
Worldwide ROS 8Bd.jpg
Radio Teletype (RTTY) Radio Teletype, also known as RTTY. 18 kHz18,000 Hz
0.018 MHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 85 Hz0.085 kHz
8.5e-5 MHz
Worldwide RTTYthmb.jpg
ReFLEX Two-way paging variant of FLEX. 896 MHz896,000,000 Hz
896,000 kHz
941 MHz941,000,000 Hz
941,000 kHz
NFM FFSK 40 kHz40,000 Hz
0.04 MHz
USA ReFlexthumbnail.jpg
SITOR-A SITOR-A is one of two modes of SITOR, which stands for Simplex Teletype Over Radio. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 350 Hz0.35 kHz
3.5e-4 MHz
Worldwide SITOR-A.jpg
SITOR-B SITOR-B is one of two modes of SITOR (Simplex Teletype Over Radio). 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FSK 350 Hz0.35 kHz
3.5e-4 MHz
Worldwide SITORB.jpg
STANAG 4285 Standardization Agreement (STANAG) 4285. NATO standard for HF communication. 1.89 MHz1,890,000 Hz
1,890 kHz
22.7 MHz22,700,000 Hz
22,700 kHz
USB PSK 2.5 kHz2,500 Hz
0.0025 MHz
Worldwide STANAG 4285.jpg
STANAG 4481 STANAG 4481 is specified by the NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) Military Agency for Standardization as a "Minimum technical equipment standards for naval HF shore-to-ship broadcast system" 2.815 MHz2,815,000 Hz
2,815 kHz
18.016 MHz18,016,000 Hz
18,016 kHz
USB FSK, PSK 1.5 kHz1,500 Hz
0.0015 MHz
3 kHz3,000 Hz
0.003 MHz
Worldwide STANAG 4481.jpg
STANAG 4529 STANAG 4529 is a NATO standard for secure maritime digital data communication 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB PSK 1.24 kHz1,240 Hz
0.00124 MHz
Worldwide STANAG4529.jpg
Saab Grintek MHF-50 MFSK Modem The MHF-50 MFSK Modem by Saab Grintek Technologies in South Africa is a data modem that utilizes RTTY, 2-FSK, and 33-MFSK to transmit data 8.58 MHz8,580,000 Hz
8,580 kHz
12.982 MHz12,982,000 Hz
12,982 kHz
USB MFSK, FSK 2.2 kHz2,200 Hz
0.0022 MHz
South Africa MHF-50.jpg
Serdolik Serdolik (aka Crowd-36) is a MFSK signal mainly used by the Russian diplomatic service and military. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB MFSK 1.4 kHz1,400 Hz
0.0014 MHz
Russia Crowd 36thmb.jpg
Signal Identification Guide
Slow-Scan Television (SSTV) Slow-scan television (SSTV) is a method for picture transmission used by amateur radio operators to transmit and receive images. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
300 MHz300,000,000 Hz
300,000 kHz
USB FM 2.5 kHz2,500 Hz
0.0025 MHz
Worldwide Robot 36waterfall.jpg
THOR THOR is an adaptation of DominoEX with MFSK16 binary varicode and FEC. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB IFK 173 Hz0.173 kHz
1.73e-4 MHz
524 Hz0.524 kHz
5.24e-4 MHz
Worldwide THORthmb.png
THROB THROB is a unique data mode that relies heavily on DSP techniques, using MFSK and AM modulation techniques together. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB MFSK 72 Hz0.072 kHz
7.2e-5 MHz
188 Hz0.188 kHz
1.88e-4 MHz
Worldwide THROB1prev.png
Terrestrial Trunked Radio (TETRA) A professional mobile radio and two-way transceiver (walkie-talkie) specification 380 MHz380,000,000 Hz
380,000 kHz
430 MHz430,000,000 Hz
430,000 kHz
NFM PSK 25 kHz25,000 Hz
0.025 MHz
Europe TETRA Waterfallthmb.png
Tetrapol Digital communication system used by police and military in Europe. 370 MHz370,000,000 Hz
370,000 kHz
400 MHz400,000,000 Hz
400,000 kHz
NFM GMSK 12.5 kHz12,500 Hz
0.0125 MHz
Europe Tetrapolthmb.jpg
Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) Signal is from a Chrysler TPMS (Tire-Pressure Monitoring System) sensor. 315 MHz315,000,000 Hz
315,000 kHz
433 MHz433,000,000 Hz
433,000 kHz
AM Worldwide TPMS.png
Toyota Car Key Wireless entry rolling code car key. 315 MHz315,000,000 Hz
315,000 kHz
433 MHz433,000,000 Hz
433,000 kHz
AM 40 kHz40,000 Hz
0.04 MHz
Worldwide ToyotaCarFob Waterfall.png
US Military BR-6028 VFT BR-6028 is a VFT (Voice Frequency Telegraph) frequency and time diversity modem using 7 data channels 7.454 MHz7,453,500 Hz
7,453.5 kHz
USB FSK 3.1 kHz3,100 Hz
0.0031 MHz
USA VFT.jpg
UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) Time Standard UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) time standard transmission from NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) stations WWV in Fort Collins, Colorado USA and WWVH in Kauai, Hawaii. 2.5 MHz2,500,000 Hz
2,500 kHz
25 MHz25,000,000 Hz
25,000 kHz
AM 4 kHz4,000 Hz
0.004 MHz
USA UTC Image.jpg
Upper Sideband Voice Single side band, specifically upper side band. Used in the HF band by amateur radio hams and aircraft weather reports. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB AM 1.9 kHz1,900 Hz
0.0019 MHz
Worldwide USB Waterfallthmb.png
VHF Data Link (VDL2) A modern version of ACARS. 136.975 MHz136,975,000 Hz
136,975 kHz
NFM PSK 25 kHz25,000 Hz
0.025 MHz
Worldwide VDL2 Waterfallthmb.jpg
VHF Omnidirectional Range (VOR) A type of radio navigation system used by aircraft. 108 MHz108,000,000 Hz
108,000 kHz
117.95 MHz117,950,000 Hz
117,950 kHz
NFM AM, FM 21 kHz21,000 Hz
0.021 MHz
Worldwide VORthmb.jpg
Vaisala RS92SGP Weather Balloon (Radiosonde) Weather balloon (radiosonde) telemetry data. 400.15 MHz400,150,000 Hz
400,150 kHz
405.99 MHz405,990,000 Hz
405,990 kHz
NFM GFSK 5.5 kHz5,500 Hz
0.0055 MHz
Worldwide Radiosonde.jpg
Weatherfax Weatherfax (Also known as Radiofax, HF-FAX, WEFAX, and Weather Facsimile) primarily used worldwide for the dissemination of weather charts, satellite weather images, and forecasts to ships at sea. The oceans are covered by coastal stations in various countries. 3 MHz3,000,000 Hz
3,000 kHz
30 MHz30,000,000 Hz
30,000 kHz
USB FM 3 kHz3,000 Hz
0.003 MHz
Worldwide Weather Fascimile.jpg
Wideband FM (WFM) Used for typical broadcast radio, and in some wireless headsets and speakers. 65 MHz65,000,000 Hz
65,000 kHz
108 MHz108,000,000 Hz
108,000 kHz
WFM FM 54 kHz54,000 Hz
0.054 MHz
Worldwide Wideband FM.jpg
XM Satellite Radio XM Satellite Radio: Terrestrial Repeater Signal 2,332.5 MHz2,332,500,000 Hz
2,332,500 kHz
2,345 MHz2,345,000,000 Hz
2,345,000 kHz
OFDM, PSK 5 MHz5,000,000 Hz
5,000 kHz
USA No Audio File XM sattelite radio.jpg

Requested Signals

If you have these signals (or any other not on the list) please either add the waterfall image and sample sound as an MP3 to the wiki and edit the page, or email me at rtlsdrblog__AT__gmail__DOT__com for addition. Please consult the instructions here - Adding An Example Signal.

 Description
Emergency Managers Weather Information Network (EMWIN)
PACKET 1200
Voice Inversion Scrambling

Unidentified Signals

If you have an unidentified signal that you would like the wiki readers to take a look at please either email me at rtlsdrblog__at__gmail__dot__com or add it as a page yourself with the Category:UNID. Include as much information about the signal as you can including frequency, waterfall images, MP3 sound samples, location, bandwidth and anything else you can think of. Please add the signal using the correct template so that it will show up properly on the main page. Please consult the instructions here - Adding An Example Signal.

If you happen to be able to identify a signal, please either edit the wiki, make a note in the wiki discussion page (in the signal page click the discussion tab at the top), or email me at rtlsdrblog__at__gmail__dot__com.

Comments

Feel free to make comments about unidentified signals that you might know or anything else here.


Anonymous user #1

316 days ago
Score 0+-
unknown 469 is a signal from wireless alarm monitoring services. Homes and businesses with alarm systems can have a wireless transmitter for backup or for locations without a phone line.

Anonymous user #2

316 days ago
Score 0+-
unknown 550 is most likely noise from the USB interface of a PC or noise from a monitor. I have seen a very similar signal and found it to be noise from the PC.

Anonymous user #3

308 days ago
Score 0+-

I'd like to put in a request for info and signal sample on RD-LAP and also on the Motorola MDT signals that preceded the 19.2 kbps rdlap, such as MDC4800.

This is sold by Motorola as part of their DataTAC network package. It used to be active as part of the ARDIS network nationwide, but I believe that has all been retired (maybe still used somewhere? Not 100% sure)

Also, it is still used by some police departments and others with private datatac networks.

Fusionimage

304 days ago
Score 0+-

'Unknown Lines' must be LTR Standard/LTR PassPort/LTR Net

I've submitted some samples to the admin, I think, he will put them here soon

Anonymous user #4

299 days ago
Score 0+-
Unknown chirping 2 I've been seeing something very similar on 936.924MHz USA Virginia.

Anonymous user #5

299 days ago
Score 0+-
Unknown Pager-Like is a variant of a FLEX pager.

Anonymous user #5

258 days ago
Score 0+-
How about a tutorial on how to "Tune In" to certain signals, when do you use LSD/USB what is "Shift" for CW ect.. I can't seem to find a good reference, but here it is very clear on how to process and recognise signals

Anonymous user #6

258 days ago
Score 0+-
Unknown 72 is a signal "BIIS1200" protocol.

Anonymous user #6

251 days ago
Score 0+-

Can someone confirm from this screenshot that it is encrypted voice I'm using DSD and i can partaily hear voices it sounds weird its hard to explain it i can definitely hear a voice but i'm unable to make out if it is male or female because the voice will go deep then soft very quickly so i'm unable to make out what is being said.

<a href="http://www.d...mqvtzh4j.png" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.d...4j_thumb.png" border="0" alt="Unknown155"/></a>

Anonymous user #6

247 days ago
Score 0+-
Unknown 409 is probably APRS / AFSK decodeable with http://sourc...ojects/qtmm/ at FM mode

Anonymous user #7

246 days ago
Score 0+-
Unknown ALE is an Over The Horizon Radar which emanates from Asia and can be heard on various HF bands and frequencies. It is quite common on the 40M amateur radio band in New Zealand amongst others.

Anonymous user #8

197 days ago
Score 0+-
That wasn't a radar!

Anonymous user #9

243 days ago
Score 0+-

Unknown 433

Could be a cheap home weather station. But 433 MHz is full of mystery signals for consumer electronics like alarm remotes and other sensors.

Trevmar

237 days ago
Score 1+-
I have added a page in the infamous Californian electricity "Smart Meter"

Anonymous user #6

237 days ago
Score 0+-
Unknown Trunking is probably TETRA

Anonymous user #10

228 days ago
Score 0+-
I am listening to an unknown signal on 13505 khz AM mode on 10-5-14 at 11:45 am EST which sounds something like a remote control when aimed at a radio(MW or LW). Pulses are short and seem to be "communicating" with each other(close and distant).

Anonymous user #5

221 days ago
Score 0+-
Unknown 15650 is Crowd-36 and Unknown 28p957 is a short-distance radar.

Anonymous user #11

210 days ago
Score 0+-

I found this web page full of digital signals: http://kb9ukd.com/digital

Listening to theese signals I think that Unknown Chirping 2 could be mmp-4800 but there are also other similar modes like SEAR, SCADA.

Anonymous user #8

208 days ago
Score 0+-

I've found a russian program to analyze signals its name is: Signals Analyzer.

I don't know how to use it but i think that is an interesting program.

Anonymous user #8

197 days ago
Score 0+-
Where is the 8 FSK system?

Anonymous user #5

189 days ago
Score 0+-
Unknown 24 is an OTHR, specifically the PLUTO II radar.

Anonymous user #5

172 days ago
Score 0+-
The one by IN87RG might not be from his location, it is from the UOT WebSDR possibly.

Anonymous user #12

162 days ago
Score 0+-
FSK441 is missing, so is Olivia, Domino, etc..

Anonymous user #13

156 days ago
Score 0+-
Unknown 40!! I've heard it too.. there is usually something idling.. sometimes the transmission is longer.. one day there was two stations of it. here https://www....=GTIQnC3f5U0

Anonymous user #8

154 days ago
Score 0+-
Unknown 155p6, signal from Turkey, Central Anatolia is APCO25 (P25) Signal.

Vic

148 days ago
Score 0+-
Unknown 72 can be decoded with MultiPSK: BIIS protocol (Binary Interchange of Information and Signaling)

Anonymous user #11

145 days ago
Score 0+-
I found Unknown chirping 2 at cca 447.7MHZ, multiple signals, Slovakia.

Anonymous user #5

140 days ago
Score 0+-
Can confirm "Unknown-1536125", hear it all the time on 462.407 MHz and 173.226 MHz.

Anonymous user #5

139 days ago
Score 0+-
Interesting...live anywhere in the Massachusetts, USA area by chance?

LargeVirus

138 days ago
Score 0+-
Original poster here, no, but I do live in Connecticut. New London County. The 173.226 MHz sounds like a time signal with an incomprehensible identification every 10 seconds, and the 462.407 MHz one sounds like a beacon.

Avsa242

137 days ago
Score 0+-
OP here. I don't know why I hadn't thought of this before, but I did a little Googling and found that the two VHF freq's are registered to an address of a town water supply. Street view shows two water tanks/towers at that address, so I'm guessing this is some sort of monitoring system. Saw your video- the waterfall looks similar, at least, to the one I posted, but it didn't sound to me like the same signal.

LargeVirus

132 days ago
Score 0+-
They all seem very different, yes. But I think they're all the same signal.

Anonymous user #5

140 days ago
Score 0+-
Unknown ionosonde-like is not an ionosonde, but it is a sounder. Specifically, the 29B6 Over The Horizon Radar sounder is pictured on the University of Twente WebSDR, it makes a paddling noise to check if a frequency is not in use. It isn't very effective since it commonly overlaps HAM bands and SW broadcast bands.

Anonymous user #5

130 days ago
Score 0+-
Thanks, i'll update it!

Anonymous user #14

139 days ago
Score 0+-

А это уважаемые товарищи идет канал видео ТВ. Где то рядом на 2 кгц ниже или выше идет звук.

http://www.s...wn_155p5.jpg

LargeVirus

121 days ago
Score 0+-
Unknown 148 is POCSAG. First is POCSAG 512, second is POCSAG 1200. Unknown 21p075 is OLIVIA, specifically, OLIVIA 8-250 in the audio file.

Anonymous user #15

120 days ago
Score 0+-
thanks friend

Anonymous user #11

118 days ago
Score 0+-

In response to the person who posted about the "Police Idling Walkie Talkie Radio Signal"

I have also found the same signal in the UK which is on the 70cm band it pulses every few seconds with 12MHz BW, I also noticed there is an other pulse signal 30 mhz apart which pulses at a slower pace once every 4 or 5 pulses.

Zimbabwe490

118 days ago
Score 0+-
how u get 12 mhz bandwidth

Anonymous user #16

66 days ago
Score 0+-

@Zimbabwe490

I meant to say khz not mhz obviously.

LargeVirus

115 days ago
Score 1+-
Unknown Lines is logic trunked radio.

Anonymous user #8

111 days ago
Score 0+-
1.8126MHZ; a female voice reading out a string of numbers in what sounds like Italian language. Heard for one hour 2100hrs GMT. This is in the Ham Radio top-band frequency range.

Anonymous user #17

108 days ago
Score 0+-
Anyone have an EPIRB signal 406.025MHz, GPS EPIRB preferred.

Anonymous user #11

106 days ago
Score 0+-
When i turn on my LCD TV, i see a interference very similar to "Unknown 550"

Anonymous user #8

97 days ago
Score 1+-

All the missing sound samples here: https://mega...GuGFwpEcxfaA

Please let me know if you need more.

Admin

87 days ago
Score 0+-
Thank you! This is a big list it might take some time to go through it though :)

Cartoonman

87 days ago
Score 0+-
I can extrapolate spectra for a good number of them (esp. the MFSK modulation types) from the audio when I have time. The rest can be placed into new pages or added to sections of pages (POCSAG 512, 1200, etc) for different modes of the same modulation.

Cartoonman

87 days ago
Score 0+-
also http://kb9ukd.com/digital/ is another good source of signals to add, anon user #12 posted it some months ago.

Anonymous user #14

83 days ago
Score 0+-

please do some waterfall images from this big collection of signals and add it to the database !

big thanks !

LargeVirus

93 days ago
Score 1+-
Unknown 432 - that is indeed morse code. What you have found is in the middle of the 70 cm band, it is a HAM transmitting his/her callsign, their callsign is VK4RBB.

Zimbabwe490

81 days ago
Score 0+-
can i ask why a morse code signal needs to devour so much bandwidth

Anonymous user #5

92 days ago
Score 1+-

Unknown 432 is an amateur radio beacon from VK4RBB SOUTHSIDE AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY INC PO BOX 294 WOODRIDGE, QLD 4114

Australia

Anonymous user #8

84 days ago
Score 0+-

thanks Anonymous user #9 for this big list of sample signals.

make the sigidwiki the one and only place for signals !

Zimbabwe490

79 days ago
Score 0+-
thanks whoever updated my page i completely forgot about it rfl

Cartoonman

79 days ago
Score 0+-

General Question: I'm gauging whether to keep a waterfall-only approach to these articles or if including the spectrum (Like California Smart Meter, DVB-T, and Digital SSTV) above the waterfall as a single image is more preferred.

Waterfalls are easier to get than spectrums, but I have noticed that certain signals sorta need the spectrum as it's a defining characteristic to it's ID (e.g. ATSC and trunked radio signals).

Or, if this is a better idea, having two separate images; one for waterfall and one for spectrum. Thoughts? I don't want to change any more images till I get a clear consensus on this.

Admin

77 days ago
Score 0+-
I think it would be best to have two separate images. The spectrum doesn't really provide any useful info for most signals, and when it does it can be simply added as an additional image.

Cartoonman

77 days ago
Score 0+-
Thanks for the clarification. I'll go ahead with the waterfalls then, and add a spectrum as an additional image.

LargeVirus

74 days ago
Score 0+-
You, Cartoonman, I like you. Let's be friends. also, Unknown 155p47 is logic trunked radio.

Anonymous user #18

73 days ago
Score 0+-
Haha, thanks :) I have an OCD for neatness and accuracy. And thanks for the ID. Someone'll merge it into the LTR article, if I don't get to it before them.

Cartoonman

73 days ago
Score 0+-
/\ that was me. forgot to log in, as usual :)

LargeVirus

73 days ago
Score 0+-
Cool, any way I can talk to you like Steam or something? =P

Cartoonman

73 days ago
Score 0+-
Hmm my steam hasn't been used in like, months (Busy with life). Search for "Cartoonman". Here's your hint on which one is me: http://puu.s...2f36c02e.jpg

Aco

72 days ago
Score 0+-

Hi Cartoonman, thanks for your excelent work on this wiki. This will help sigidwiki and Artemis database. A big problem is the frequency and bandwidth forms because actually the concept of range is not entirely implemented. If you are interested to this problem, you are well accepted in the forum of Artemis tool (http://marks...fined-value/).

Thanks again for your help.

Anonymous user #8

72 days ago
Score 0+-

Hi

I am planning to capture a signal is called PD signal, whence I done it I will add it. but in case that I need help will any body help?

Cartoonman

71 days ago
Score 0+-
Of course, the admin and other users (like myself) could help you add the signal to the wiki.

Erbo

70 days ago
Score 0+-

Very nice wiki! very helpful! Unknown 40 is very weird.

I'm located in Quebec, Canada near Montreal, lots of signal around, some unknown.

Anonymous user #13

66 days ago
Score 0+-
Unknown 28p597 is IRAN Radar, OTH radar

Cartoonman

65 days ago
Score 0+-

Thanks! Do you happen to have a link or some source to verify? OTH's are hard to properly ID, so many different ones, and they don't tend to follow general rules.

All i could find was http://www.i...dar-2012.pdf, but their sample didnt sound like this; who knows, IRAN might have developed more than this since the article.

MikeAgner

63 days ago
Score 0+-

Hi - I just joined, and noted a few things that are incorrect;

a. Serdolink is misspelled - it should be Serdolik

b. There seems to be quite a bit of confusion on the Cuban HM01 listing. DIGTRX is not a mode - it's an app originally written for digital TV, and folks try to use it to read the data sent by this station (only not very well, from what I hear). The mode is an adaptation of a ham mode known as Redundant Data File Transfer or RDFT. You can find listings for this at the well known Numbers and Oddities website, listed as 'AM/RDFT' as the mode

In the next few days I will be adding a lot of software links. Stay tuned...

Cartoonman

63 days ago
Score 0+-

Hi Mike! Thanks for noting these mistakes!. As much as I try to verify the validity of a signal, its pretty hard research.

a. Yup, Crowd 36 (aka Serdolik) has been on my list of fixing. Feel free to edit it though, take it off my agenda :p

b. Wow, thanks for the clearing up. I did find it odd that I couldn't find much information on DIGTRX as a signal. RDFT is the actual signal i take it? I've had trouble finding details on it.

MikeAgner

63 days ago
Score 0+-
Oops - RDFT = Redundant Digital File Transfer...my bad...

MikeAgner

62 days ago
Score 0+-

I'll add that to my list :.>>

Actually I found something on RDFT that might be of interest, and even a link for DIGTRX

http://swlin...nd-explains/

http://digtr...nformer.com/

I have a little more, but I'll save that for when I work on that article...CUL Mike

Anonymous user #19

62 days ago
Score 0+-

Hi All,

I have sound signal file. Need input.

http://we.tl/Xg1xwkNqTK ( Location of file )

Cartoonman

62 days ago
Score 0+-
That seems like a harmonic, not an actual signal, or if it is, it's an idling channel. perhaps this is what you found? http://www.r...is_a_birdie/

Cartoonman

61 days ago
Score 0+-
On second analysis, that does seem to be a sort of data link. Looks curiously similar to the mystery 3x PSK signal, but it's not exact. I'm not sure what this signal is, I haven't seen it before.

Anonymous user #20

61 days ago
Score 0+-
Any other input or idea on how to figure out ?

Cartoonman

61 days ago
Score 0+-
If you can post the IQ file of this signal here, or on reddit.com/r/signalidentification/, then it will be possible that someone who has seen it before will identify it.

MikeAgner

61 days ago
Score 0+-

I'd be willing to fix the Serdolink,DIGTRX and HM01 articles, but (correctly), I can't touch the main page that they link from - so these new articles would be lost (orphans).

Suggestions? Mike

Cartoonman

61 days ago
Score 0+-

Oh lol, thats not a problem. What happens is, the main page actually gets automatically updated every 24 hours. The tag that makes a page appear on the main page is, so as long as that tag exists in the article, by the next server "re-syncing", the article will be placed on the main page.

This only comes into effect when moving the name of the page. for example, moving the page Serdolink to Serdolik. Things like changing the waterfall image, bandwidth, frequency, and description are all done as you do it by direct linking, no need to wait for a server re-sync.

Cartoonman

61 days ago
Score 0+-
oops, the tag is "Category:Signal". Articles (like ones I just moved a few minutes ago) will have their former entries on the home page removed, and the new entry with the "Category:Signal" tag placed back on the main page with their new name. I just moved Amateur Morse Code Beacon so you can take a look at that for an example.

MikeAgner

60 days ago
Score 0+-

OK let's say that I used the 'MOVE' tab to rename the Serdolink article to Serdolik. If the entry is then re-indexed, it appears that all the data that was associated with the old entry on the main page is lost (as the beacon article you just moved currently is). That's not a very good scenario.

In addition there are a number of incorrect frequency references on the main page that should be fixed. For example, there is a very specific set of frequencies that HFDL uses that is listed in a PDF file found in the article - the '2.9 Mhz,29 Mhz' listing is misleading since it reads like it could be just those frequencies, and that's simply not true. Another example includes those modes listed as '3 Mhz, 30 Mhz', and again, that's very misleading, since it leads a reader to think that those specific frequencies are used.

Mike

Anonymous user #21

60 days ago
Score 0+-

Yes that is correct, when the article is moved, all data that was in the old article's location is copied to the new article's location, and the main page's link to the data from the old article is broken. However, this is automatically resolved every 24 hours by the server, as the server resync's articles that have the "Category:Signal" tag, so what happens is, the old article that was truncated of data is removed from the main page, and the new article with the "Category:signal" tag is added to the main page. Sorta like a swap.

The frequency issue is a known thing that me, the admin, and developer of Artemis Aco are aware of. For the time being, the drive is going towards listing frequency range of where the signal exists instead of individual frequencies (since for many of these signals, they can appear at so many different frequencies that it would be pointless to list them all). The format of the site is due to undergo some changes to fit this push, so for the time being, I think that's the direction we're headed with the frequencies. Same goes for bandwidth, for signals that have a range of bandwidths.

Cartoonman

60 days ago
Score 0+-
/\ I wasn't logged in. this is me. oops lol.

MikeAgner

60 days ago
Score 0+-

What you could do in the case of the HFDL listing is to say something along the lines of 'See Article' in the 'Frequency' column, and let the article itself handle the link for the frequencies. They do change occasionally, and it's usually reported on the HFDL and/or UDXF Yahoo groups

As to the ham stuff - while there is some variation due to different regulations in other countries, amateur radio digital freqs are fairly restricted to certain parts of the bands, at least in the US. Examples of this include the 5 Mhz allocation the US shares with a few countries, but not everyone worldwide has access there. Another one is the 70 Mhz band allocated in the UK, but not in the US.

This website has a basic bandplan, along with the new 5 Mhz allocations that were changed just recently...

http://www.a...-allocations

and this one lists a ton of amateur modes and where they can be found. Again, it's not necessarily complete, but it's far better than just saying '3 Mhz, 30 Mhz' or some such...

http://bandp...php?band=All

Perhaps these links could be put in the writeup at the top of the page, then for each of the amateur mode listings, for the HF frequencies, point the reader to these.

Mike

Anonymous user #21

60 days ago
Score 0+-

You make a very good point; for most cases these frequencies are confined to amateur bands designated by regulations.

I think your idea is great, putting these links under the Frequencies section. You may have to figure out all the little intricacies of different region's band allocations though.


For signals that aren't solely amateur though, especially ones like ALE or OTH that are extremely erratic, or even ionosondes, listing the range that they are found at in the way I mentioned above in my previous comment /\ is, to me, the best way of defining their 'frequency'.

Cartoonman

60 days ago
Score 0+-
/\ I wasn't logged in. this is me. oops lol.

Cartoonman

60 days ago
Score 0+-
The only little problem that can come up, and this is subject to debate since I'm not an expert in Ham Radio, but individual frequencies of where these signals can be found could potentially change as time goes on, so they will require consistent updating, either by the site owners linked, or by users on this site.

Cartoonman

60 days ago
Score 0+-
Also, just for the record, http://qrg.globaltuners.com/ <- they have done an outstanding job with categorizing signals found at specific frequencies that are even geolocated. Perhaps we could point users to use their database when looking for specific frequencies of certain signals.

MikeAgner

60 days ago
Score 0+-

Ham radio frequencies tend not to move a whole lot - yes there are regulatory changes from time to time, but the basic ranges - which that 2nd article would be quite useful for, in the case of HF frequencies - remain pretty much unchanged for quite a while. If the frequency ranges were in the article rather than the main page, it would be a snap to fix.

The problem I see here is one of interpretation - if someone who is new sees something that says '3 Mhz, 30 Mhz', then they might think those 2 specific frequencies are the ones to check, when in fact that's incorrect.

What I might suggest for clarity is to say 'Any HF 3-30 Mhz' which is somewhat better.

For those modes that aren't ham-related nor broadcast-related, (or higher than 30 Mhz), the Utility DXers Forum Yahoo group is really the place to check for things like this. It's a very active group and has LOTS of digital stuff reported very frequently

Mike

Cartoonman

60 days ago
Score 0+-

Yup, the 3 Mhz , 30 Mhz is due to be dealt with soon. The admin will figure out how to go about fixing it so that it can display ranges.

I haven't visited the forum before, I'll give it a go, thanks!

MikeAgner

60 days ago
Score 0+-

ok I MOVEd Serdolink to Serdolik. Let's see if the server catches up in a day or two

Mike

MikeAgner

59 days ago
Score 0+-

OK this a bit more of a thorny problem. There are 2 articles - 'Cuban Numbers Station HM01' and 'DIGTRX' which basically describe the same thing. I can convert one article, but the other is unnecessarily redundant and not needed.

The first question is the reference that should be used- since many of the HF data listed on this page are named by their mode, I would suggest which ever page is to be created would be called RDFT

The next question is which article should be converted? Which ever one I convert, there will still be the other which is unneeded. Mike

Cartoonman

59 days ago
Score 0+-

Pick whichever one you feel would be the least work in redoing. I'll handling the article merging for the other article.

Do try to keep as much content that's relevant as possible in the article, (like, for example, leave the DIGITRX waterfall and sound sample and list it as one example of RDFT in a section). Discarding precious information means more time putting it back in later :p. And details are always a plus.

MikeAgner

59 days ago
Score 0+-
OK I'll tackle this tomorrow eve...Mike

Anonymous user #22

58 days ago
Score 0+-
All the signals described here seem to center on one frequency, or on a small set of frequencies. I frequently hear an HF signal, usually on 40m, that consists of digital "noise", rather loud, that either increases or decreases frequency very slowly (maybe by one to ten Hz per second). It never seems to interfere with amateur QSOs, maybe because it doesn't stay on one frequency for long. I can't determine the modulation mode just by listening to the audio. -- David Spector, Southern Maine, USA.

Cartoonman

58 days ago
Score 0+-

would they possibly be something like this? :

http://i.imgur.com/0OMkRqJ.jpg

Of course not to this degree, but something like it. Odd spurrs and things. Some call them "worms". Not sure exactly what causes them.

Cartoonman

58 days ago
Score 0+-
I'd say some are most likely ionosondes of some sort, or HF radars or testing signals.

Cartoonman

58 days ago
Score 0+-
There are also, and I've seen these on the websdr at Univ. of Twente, lots of freq hopping blips, that im sure are coming from radars or research transmitters. Those are a bit harder to categorize, since documentation on them may be sparse to non-existant, and tracking them may even be harder

MikeAgner

58 days ago
Score 0+-

All right, I did the move of the Cuban article, rewrote it, combining the DIGTRX article and the data I had - the move didn't take. No new entry was posted on the main page; however there is a redirect from the Cuban link to the RDFT article.

Something got hosed here...but what?

Thanks...Mike

Cartoonman

58 days ago
Score 0+-

The move did take. The homepage, as stated before, does not update in real time. It takes a day (about 3-6am EST is when the sync happens from my estimates) for the homepage to update. I checked the logs and you moved the Cuban page to RDFT, as stated.

In about a day, the old Cuban link will be removed, and RDFT will be added to the home page in it's place, assuming you kept the "Category:Signal" tag in the article.

Notice that an article I'm currently working on, SSTV (Slow-Scan Television) is not on the home page, despite being made. Without the Signal tag, it will not be read by the server to be added to the main page.

Cartoonman

58 days ago
Score 0+-

You can see the server's activity "log" here: http://www.s...ecentChanges

I use this all the time to make sure changes I made went through, as well as to keep track of changes made to articles made by other users, in case of a need to fix them up or move them around.

MikeAgner

57 days ago
Score 0+-

For the Olivia article, you can find samples and screenshots on these 2 webpages;

http://www.o...iviaView.htm

http://www.w...es/index.htm

Click on 'Olivia' from the left frame

Cartoonman

57 days ago
Score 0+-
Haha, thanks! I actually saw the second one. I plan on spending a lot of time with fldigi to make waterfalls for these modes. Its what i've been looking for to use for MFSK. I'm still debating how I will organize this large collection of signal modes, since in reality, only a handful are used with any frequency (PSK31, MFSK16, etc)

Cartoonman

57 days ago
Score 0+-
If you have any ideas, shoot em my way.

Admin

57 days ago
Score 1+-

Hi Guys,

Just letting you know that we'll be making changes to the wiki over the next few days to add some features like forms (so users who don't know wiki syntax can add a signal easily), and to implement things like frequency ranges on the main page for Artemis etc. So during this time the wiki might look a little broken. You can still add information to the wiki, but just be aware that the main template will be changing soon. When its done i'll make sure all the pages are updated and cleaned up.

Admin

44 days ago
Score 1+-
Just a quick update. Most of the changes are almost done, and the front page should be back to normal operation soonish too.

MikeAgner

56 days ago
Score 0+-

Cartoonman - there are a lot of screenshots and audio samples of MFSK stuff on the fldigi site as well - just pick that from the left panel.

If you're up for fixing the main page along with the upgrades, I'd like to send you a list - there's a fair amount of misunderstandings and stuff that's just wrong - but it's way too much to put on a simple text messenger like this. To where should I send it?

Mike

MikeAgner

56 days ago
Score 0+-

You can also find a nice summation of many of the amateur digital modes, and at least 1 web page for each, here....

http://wiki....mateur_Radio

Cartoonman

56 days ago
Score 0+-

Yup. The screenshots on the site are sorta too small for this website, and not the best resolution. I have a method of extracting spectra from audio, so it's not a problem.

Ooo, if you have fixes, you can put em in my talk page here: http://www.s...k:Cartoonman

And thanks for that link! I haven't seen this before but I have taken a look at some of the links they have.

When I wrote these articles, the main goal was primarily to get the signal up on the site (properly ID'd as much as I could verify), and put some information I found with it. Fact checking would simply take too much time and would end up with even slower submissions of signals than I am currently doing now. I would love to have other users write up factually correct and accurate descriptions for these signals, as it frees up my time to focus on IDing and adding signals, including getting good audio samples and waterfall images. A lot of my time is spent just trying to verify if the signal I have is what I think it is.

Cartoonman

56 days ago
Score 0+-
Btw, this isn't to say I don't fact check at all, I do fact check, but understand that I commonly find conflicting sources on information for these signals so it becomes a rather involved task sifting through misinformation; its inevitable that some will get through.

Anonymous user #10

39 days ago
Score 1+-

The last signal "weird moving signal" I know EXACTLY what that is, it is an OLD type of telemetry signal used to remotly send the value displayed on a gauge or dial, It works by taking the circular movement of a needle on a dial (like a thermometer or pressure gauge) and connecting the shaft to a potentiometer and using the pot to control a VCO, you get the data by knowing the "center" frequency and calculating the offset value of the Continuous signal as it moves up and down, the ammount it moves is displayed at the RX end by taking the difference in frequency and using that value to move a dial on a gauge.

This tech dates WAYYY back, back to the 1930's

Cartoonman

29 days ago
Score 1+-
I will look into this as soon as I get a chance, thanks!

Admin

29 days ago
Score 0+-
I thought that it was probably just be some sort of internal noise from the RTL-SDR, but this might be right too.
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