Strong UNID Horn-like signal

From Signal Identification Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Strong UNID Horn-like signal
Loudbuzzing2.PNG
Frequencies 926.800.000".000" is not declared as a valid unit of measurement for this property.
Frequency Range 0 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz).kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz
MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
0 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz).kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz
MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
Mode LSBLower Side Band Modulation
Modulation FMFrequency Modulation
Bandwidth 250Khz250,000 HzHertz (Hz), unit of frequency, defined as one cycle per second (1 Hz).
0.25 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
250 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz
0.25 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
250 kHzKiloHertz (kHz) 10^3 Hz
0.25 MHzMegaHertz (MHz) 10^6 Hz
Location Alabama, USA
Short Description Incredibly strong horn-like signal.
I/Q Raw Recording
Audio Sample

This signal occasionally makes a few "blips" then follows with a lengthy horn-like sound. After looking at other unknown signals, I think it may (or may not) be a baby monitor.

Edit: When listened to in WFMWideband Frequency Modulation mode, background noise can be heard. It appears to be either a baby monitor or some other one-way radio.